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Mystic Chips Review

June 1st, 2010 10:10am
Rating:
Reviewed by Thomas Sciacca
As magic props go, this I feel is a quite a fine one. The secret workings of this effect are so subtle if not mathematical, that your spectator will indeed see you as an appropriatly gifted person.
I am a self acknowledged gadget geek. I can blame Adam West's 1960's Batman for this trait. Then, there's Sean Connery and James Bond. I am thrilled to be able to carry 2 and one half decades of my lifes work, inside of a wallet sized device known as my FLASHDRIVE.
Now, if I truly had the ability to acertain colors BLIND, why would I demonstrate that ability by carrying around an unusual brass box, with equally unusual color dotted brass chilps? Why not something simpler? Again, I'm often torn between my appreciation for some of the technical wizardry that magic inventors come up with-but, I also bear in mind, that certain props like mystic chips, look like NOTHING that any average person would 'happen' to have in their pocket at any given time. Here's how I justify this very clever prop and effect...
When I present this, I refer to TRUE experiments which have been done, in laboratories, based on neurological responses to COLOR and VALUE. The device which was used, IS known as THE GALVONIC SKIN RESPONSE. In more common terms, the LIE DETECTOR TEST. As these experiments went, a person who stares at a panel of red, orange, or yellow, will experience an automatically HIGHER level of bodily response...i.e., their respiration levels will climb! These responses are involuntary and automatic. Conversly, green, blue, purple, will have calming effects upon the subject, ALL of this being recordable via wires hooked up to the subject, and recorded into a machine. That said, I refer to this little brass box as a version of a scientific test. Sometimes, I use this effect as a lie detector test, using only the black and white chips. I ask the spectator to place ONE or the OTHER into the box, and invite them to LIE or tell the truth, as to the contents.
My presentation is scientific, and, my patter is not just B.S.-this is actually one of the few effects I can do, where my patter is based on authentic research.
Ofcourse, if I really could perform such a color/value telling miracles, I wouldn't need this pretty prop. I'd be able to use paper cards and, crayons. There are other similar effects out there, which use objects far less prop looking that 'mystic chips'. I have and use some of these as well. The more normal the prop, the greater the impact, IF the effect is clever enough. This effect IS clever. But, it is magic prop-looking.
I STILL like and use it, BECAUSE I am a gadget geek!
Foolability factor, is HIGH. Quality of craftsmanship, also HIGH. I love props that are solid, like steel, wood, in this case brass. Maybe the only thing I griped briefly about, is that the box cannot carry five chips in it, which would make it easier to carry. That could not work, so, I solved that by obtaining a velvet pouch from a jewelry store, so that I didn't have a box and four loose chips in my pocket.
I recommend this...but also suggest having other, more commonplace props to reveal your so called 'third eye' abilities. I'm a gadget geek, but I bear in mind that gadgets raise more suspicion that NON gadgets.

Product info for Mystic Chips

Publisher: Magic Makers
Average Rating:  (1)
Retail Price: $36.00
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Manufacturer's Description:

A brass container, lid, and five colored chips are presented. With the performer's back turned, the spectator is asked to select a chip, remember it's color and place it into the container. The spectator is also asked to screw on the lid and hide the remaining four chips in his or her hand. The performer then turns around, not being able to see inside the container or into the spectator's hand. The performer tells the spectator his or her selected color.


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